This vignette documents the basis and functionality of the monitor_nowcast() function, which converts a ws_monitor object's values to NowCast values. We provide details on the NowCast algorithm and our functional implementation thereof. We also provide examples to highlight specific attributes and potential points of confusion in the algorithm and/or our implementation.

This vignette also briefly covers the monitor_aqi() function, which uses the monitor_nowcast() function to convert raw PM~2.5~ data into NowCast-based AQI values.

What is NowCast?

NowCast is an air quality data smoothing algorithm that puts an emphasis on recent values when measurements are unstable, and approaches a long-term (e.g. 12-hour) average when measurements are stable.

The original algorithm, known as the Conroy method, was developed in 2003 to make real-time air quality measurements roughly comparable to established regulatory air quality health thresholds (e.g. 24‐hour PM~2.5~ standards). However, that method was shown to be slow to respond to rapidly changing air quality conditions, which, at best, reduced public confidence in disseminated AQI values, and at worst, had the potential to adversely affect the health of those in high impact areas (e.g. near wildfires).

In response, EPA developed a new method – the Reff method – in 2013 to be more responsive to rapidly changing air quality conditions. We find technical support for applying the new NowCast algorithm to hourly PM~2.5~, PM~10~, and O~3~ data, though theoretically it could be applied to regular-interval time series data of any type, including other criteria pollutants.

We provide algorithm specifics for PM~2.5~, PM~10~, and O~3~ below.

Sources:
https://www3.epa.gov/airnow/ani/pm25_aqi_reporting_nowcast_overview.pdf
https://forum.airnowtech.org/t/the-nowcast-for-ozone-and-pm/172

The NowCast Algorithm (Reff Method)

The following sections outline the NowCast algorithm.

NowCast Equation

The NowCast value for a given hour can be calculated as follows:

\[ NowCast = \frac{\sum_{i=1}^{N}{w^{i-1}c_i}}{\sum_{i=1}^{N}w^{i-1}} \]

where \(i\), \(N\), \(w\) and \(c\) are as defined in the sections below.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NowCast_(air_quality_index)
https://www3.epa.gov/airnow/ani/pm25_aqi_reporting_nowcast_overview.pdf

Data Selection

The NowCast algorithm uses hourly averages from the prior \(N\) clock hours, where the value of \(N\) depends on the pollutant being processed:

The hourly averages are denoted below by \(c_i\), where \(i\) represents the number of hours before present. For example, \(c_1\), \(c_2\), \(c_3\), \(…\), \(c_N\) represent the hourly averages for the most recent 1, 2, 3, \(…\), \(N\) hours.

Source:
https://forum.airnowtech.org/t/the-nowcast-for-ozone-and-pm/172

Weight Factor

Using the \(N\) data points specified above, define the weight factor \(w^*\) as follows:

\[ w^* = 1- \frac{c_{max}-c_{min}}{c_{max}} = \frac{c_{min}}{c_{max}} \]

where

NowCast-related literature usually gives the equation for \(w^*\) in one of two basic forms, both of which are included above for reference. Note that both forms are equivalent.

Sources:
https://forum.airnowtech.org/t/the-nowcast-for-ozone-and-pm/172
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NowCast_(air_quality_index)

Minimum Weight Factor

Before plugging into the NowCast equation, \(w*\) is updated to \(w\) for PM~2.5~ and PM~10~ as follows:

\[ w = \begin{cases} w^* & \text{if} & w^*>\frac{1}{2} \ \frac{1}{2} & \text{if} & w^*\leq \frac{1}{2} \ \end{cases} \]

For O~3~, there is no minimum weight factor, so we define \(w = w^*\)

Source:
https://forum.airnowtech.org/t/the-nowcast-for-ozone-and-pm/172

Truncation

Final NowCast values are truncated based on the type of data being processed:

Source:
https://forum.airnowtech.org/t/the-nowcast-for-ozone-and-pm/172

Algorithm Expansion

For PM~2.5~, which uses 12 hours of data, the NowCast equation can be expanded as follows:

\[ NowCast = \frac {w^0c_1 + w^1c_2 + w^2c_3 + w^3c_4 + w^4c_5 + w^5c_6 + w^6c_7 + w^7c_8 + w^8c_9 + w^9c_{10} + w^{10}c_{11} + w^{11}c_{12}} {w^0 + w^1 + w^2 + w^3 + w^4 + w^5 + w^6 + w^7 + w^8 + w^9 + w^{10} + w^{11}} \]

Note that:

When written this way, it is easy to see that in the extreme case where \(w = 1\) (i.e. if \(c_{min} = c_{max}\)) the equation above reduces to:

\[ NowCast = \frac{\sum_{i=1}^{12}{c_i}}{12} \]

which is just a simple 12-hour arithmetic average. Incidentally, all 12 hourly averages and the 12-hour average itself would all be equivalent in this case.

In the case of highly variable PM~2.5~ data, \(w\) would be set to the minimum value of \(½\), and the most recent data would carry the majority of the weight in the equation above.

Implementation Details

The following sections expand on specifics of the NowCast algorithm and details regarding our functional implementation.

Missing Data

The NowCast algorithm ignores terms corresponding to hours for which a valid observation is not available. For example, suppose PM~2.5~ is invalid for all but the first three and last three hours of a 12-hour period. Then the PM~2.5~ NowCast equation takes the following form:

\[ NowCast = \frac {w^0c_1 + w^1c_2 + w^2c_3 + \color{gray}{\text{[note: middle values ignored]}} + w^9c_{10} + w^{10}c_{11} + w^{11}c_{12}} {w^0 + w^1 + w^2 + \color{gray}{\text{[note: middle values ignored]}} + w^9 + w^{10} + w^{11}} \]

Minimum data availability requirements do apply, however. See the following section for details.

Source:
https://www3.epa.gov/airnow/ani/pm25_aqi_reporting_nowcast_overview.pdf

Data Availability Requirements

To get a valid NowCast value, the NowCast algorithm simply requires valid data for at least two of the three most recent clock hours. This means that a valid NowCast value can be calculated from as little as two valid hours, even if 12 hours are typically used in the calculation.

Source:
https://www3.epa.gov/airnow/ani/pm25_aqi_reporting_nowcast_overview.pdf

However, note that https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NowCast_(air_quality_index) says:

Because the most recent hours of data are weighted so heavily in the NowCast when PM levels are changing, EPA does not report the NowCast when data is missing for c~1~ or c~2~.

While this seems like a reasonable approach, we could not find a source for this statement (in the Wikipedia page sources nor elsewhere), so for now we still allow valid NowCast values to be calculated even if one of c~1~ or c~2~ is invalid.

Argument: includeShortTerm

As mentioned above, the NowCast algorithm only requires two valid hours to calculate valid values. Does this mean that the monitor_nowcast() function can begin reporting valid values after the second hour in the data (assuming the first two hours are both valid)?

We assert that it would be inappropriate to do so, usually.

In most cases a user will have created a ws_monitor object using one of the *_createMonitorObject() or *_load(), functions, which return data for a specific period of time. Data before this period is not necessarily invalid, it was simply not retrieved. But the function itself has no way of knowing whether such earlier data exists, so it has no choice but to consider earlier hours “invalid”. This means that, if followed by-the-book, the NowCast algorithm could return different values for a given hour depending on whether or not the earlier data had been retrieved. This is not a desirable behavior, so by default the monitor_nowcast() returns invalid NowCast values until the \(N\)th^ hour of data.

However, we provide a manual override in includeShortTerm=TRUE which causes the function to return valid values as per the bare-bones data availability requirements described above, treating the hours before the beginning of the data as invalid. Thus, it can return “valid” NowCast values as early as the second (valid) hour in the data.

This argument may be useful (or even appropriate) for datasets where the beginning of the data truly corresponds to the beginning of the monitoring, such as if a new monitor has just been installed. In this case, data prior to the first hour is truly invalid since it does not exist. The argument may also be useful for field personnel looking to ensure that their monitor has been successfully plugged in to the data processing pipeline, even if the values themselves are not truly representative of the data for the past \(N\) hours.

Negative Values

In the NowCast literature we find no mention of negative values, which, while aphysical, are common in air quality monitoring data (see https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/amtic/files/2014conference/monpmpart3.pdf). Thus, we do not adjust negative values up to zero in the monitor_nowcast() function itself. However, note that this may be done when creating a ws_monitor object in the first place.

Negative values are handled prior to converting NowCast or other values to AQI, per https://forum.airnowtech.org/t/how-does-airnow-handle-negative-hourly-concentrations/143.

Negative Weight Factors

While PM~2.5~ and PM~10~ have minimum weight factors of \(½\), there is no minimum weight factor for O~3~. Does this mean O~3~ could have negative weight factors? We find no mention of this in the NowCast literature; however, we assume \(w_{min}\) cannot be negative since otherwise the calculation could become overwhelmed by outrageous weight factors, even as large as negative infinity (e.g. if \(c_{min}<0\) and \(c_{max}=0\)). This assumption is built into our monitor_nowcast() function.

Argument: version

The version argument sets defaults for the number of hours in the lookback \(N\) (numHrs), the minimum weight factor \(c_{min}\) (weightFactorMin), and the number of digits to which the final data is truncated (digits).

The default setting is version='pm25' since this is the parameter most commonly stored in ws_monitor objects.

version='ozone' supports the O~3~ NowCast as described above.

version='pmAsian' supports an alternative shorter-term NowCast as proposed here: https://aqicn.org/faq/2015-03-15/air-quality-nowcast-a-beginners-guide/

Although the NowCast algorithm itself supports PM~10~, we do not currently provide functionality for this parameter in the monitor_nowcast() function.

In the future we may allow manual override of the settings described above to allow for custom NowCast-type algorithms.

NowCast and AQI Calculations

The EPA uses an Air Quality Index to put different pollutants on the same scale. From their site:

Think of the AQI as a yardstick that runs from 0 to 500. The higher the AQI value, the greater the level of air pollution and the greater the health concern. For example, an AQI value of 50 represents good air quality with little potential to affect public health, while an AQI value over 300 represents hazardous air quality.

We provide the monitor_aqi() function to convert the PM2.5 data in a ws_monitor object into NowCast-based AQI values in the 0-500 range.

Examples

The following examples demonstrate the functionality of monitor_nowcast() and specifics of its implementation.

Setup

For the following examples we will use the Northwest Megafires data from the PWFSLSmoke package. In particular, we will look at PM~2.5~ data from Omak, WA, which was heavily impacted by smoke from wildfires during the second half of August, 2015:

suppressPackageStartupMessages(library(PWFSLSmoke))

N_M <- monitor_subset(Northwest_Megafires, tlim=c(20150801,20150831),
                      timezone="America/Los_Angeles")
Omak <- monitor_subset(N_M, monitorIDs='530470013_01')
Omak_nowcast <- monitor_nowcast(Omak)

plot of chunk unnamed-chunk-3

Example 1: Basic Formula Verification

In the code above we used the monitor_nowcast() function to calculate PM~2.5~ NowCast values for the Omak ws_monitor object. Let's see if we can verify the function's output for a single hour.

Below is the Omak PM~2.5~ data for the first 12 hours of 8/21/15. Let's see if we can verify the accuracy of the NowCast value for the last hour in this series, 8/21/15 Hour 11.

Omak_2015_08_21 <- monitor_subset(Omak, tlim=c(2015082100, 2015082111))
(example1_df <- Omak_2015_08_21$data)
              datetime 530470013_01
1  2015-08-21 00:00:00        123.3
2  2015-08-21 01:00:00         80.2
3  2015-08-21 02:00:00         49.3
4  2015-08-21 03:00:00        101.8
5  2015-08-21 04:00:00         93.7
6  2015-08-21 05:00:00        143.2
7  2015-08-21 06:00:00        215.4
8  2015-08-21 07:00:00        130.6
9  2015-08-21 08:00:00        129.2
10 2015-08-21 09:00:00         59.8
11 2015-08-21 10:00:00         27.4
12 2015-08-21 11:00:00         46.3

First we'll pull out just the values themselves, and reverse them so the most recent values come first (i.e. so the vector represents \(c_1\), \(c_2\), \(…\), \(c_N\)).

(example1_values <- rev(example1_df$`530470013_01`))
 [1]  46.3  27.4  59.8 129.2 130.6 215.4 143.2  93.7 101.8  49.3  80.2 123.3

Per the NowCast algorithm, we define \(w*\) as \(\frac{c_{min}}{c_{max}}\):

(w_star <- min(example1_values)/max(example1_values))
[1] 0.1272052

We now define \(w\) based on \(w^*\) and the minimum weight factor; recall that \(w_{min}=\frac{1}{2}\) for PM~2.5~:

(w <- max(1/2, w_star))
[1] 0.5

Thus, the numerator of the NowCast equation for Hour 11

\[ w^0c_1 + w^1c_2 + w^2c_3 + w^3c_4 + w^4c_5 + w^5c_6 + w^6c_7 + w^7c_8 + w^8c_9 + w^9c_{10} + w^{10}c_{11} + w^{11}c_{12} \]

becomes the following:

\(0.5^0 \times 46.3 + 0.5^1 \times 27.4 + 0.5^2 \times 59.8 + 0.5^3 \times 129.2 + 0.5^4 \times 130.6 + 0.5^5 \times 215.4\) +
\(0.5^6 \times 143.2 + 0.5^7 \times 93.7 + 0.5^8 \times 101.8 + 0.5^9 \times 49.3 + 0.5^{10} \times 80.2 + 0.5^{11} \times 123.3\)

which we can calculate in R as follows

(numer <- sum(w^(0:11)*example1_values))
[1] 109.5958

Meanwhile, the denominator

\[ w^0 + w^1 + w^2 + w^3 + w^4 + w^5 + w^6 + w^7 + w^8 + w^9 + w^{10} + w^{11} \]

becomes the following:

\(0.5^0 + 0.5^1 + 0.5^2 + 0.5^3 + 0.5^4 + 0.5^5 + 0.5^6 + 0.5^7 + 0.5^8 + 0.5^9 + 0.5^{10} + 0.5^{11}\)

which we can calculate in R as follows

(denom <- sum(w^(0:11)))
[1] 1.999512

Dividing the numerator by the denominator gives a value of

[1] 54.81126

which we truncate to one decimal place for a final NowCast value of 54.8 for 8/21/15 Hour 11.

So how does this compare to our monitor_nowcast() output for the same hour?

monitor_subset(Omak_nowcast, tlim=rep(2015082111, 2))$data
             datetime 530470013_01
1 2015-08-21 11:00:00         54.8

Right on!

Example 2: Short Missing Data Period

So we have verified the calculation for a period with 12 valid hours. But how does the function handle missing data periods? Let's take a look at a short period of missing data to find out.

Omak_2015_08_24 <- monitor_subset(Omak, tlim=c(2015082412, 2015082423))
(example2_df <- Omak_2015_08_24$data)
              datetime 530470013_01
1  2015-08-24 12:00:00        461.7
2  2015-08-24 13:00:00        486.2
3  2015-08-24 14:00:00        510.4
4  2015-08-24 15:00:00        583.0
5  2015-08-24 16:00:00        645.7
6  2015-08-24 17:00:00        745.5
7  2015-08-24 18:00:00           NA
8  2015-08-24 19:00:00        711.0
9  2015-08-24 20:00:00        683.3
10 2015-08-24 21:00:00        589.8
11 2015-08-24 22:00:00        504.6
12 2015-08-24 23:00:00        478.5

Here we see that the monitor data is missing for Hour 18. We want to verify that this hour is properly excluded from the NowCast calculation for subsequent hours. We also want to ensure that NowCast returns valid values for all hours in the vicinity, since all hours meet the minimum data availability requirements (i.e. two of three most recent hours valid).

Formula Verification

Let's see if we can verify the accuracy of the NowCast value for Hour 23.

We again begin by pulling out our vector of values \(c_1\), \(c_2\), \(…\), \(c_N\)

(example2_values <- rev(example2_df$`530470013_01`))
 [1] 478.5 504.6 589.8 683.3 711.0    NA 745.5 645.7 583.0 510.4 486.2 461.7

and calculating \(w*\) and \(w\)

w_star <- min(example2_values, na.rm=TRUE)/max(example2_values, na.rm=TRUE)
(w <- max(1/2, w_star))
[1] 0.6193159

This time our numerator and denominator should both exclude the 6th term, since \(c_6\) is invalid. So we have

validIndexes <- which(!is.na(example2_values))
numer <- sum(w^(validIndexes-1)*example2_values[validIndexes])
denom <- sum(w^(validIndexes-1))
numer/denom
[1] 543.896

We truncate the value above to one decimal place for a final NowCast value of 543.8 for 8/24/15 Hour 23.

So how does this compare to our monitor_nowcast() output for the same hour?

monitor_subset(Omak_nowcast, tlim=rep(2015082423, 2))$data
             datetime 530470013_01
1 2015-08-24 23:00:00        543.8

Again, right on!

Missing Data Verification

A quick look at the monitored data alongside the NowCast data shows that all NowCast hours are valid, as we would expect since only one monitored hour is invalid.

example2_df$nowcast <- monitor_subset(Omak_nowcast, tlim=c(2015082412, 2015082423))$data$`530470013_01`
colnames(example2_df) <- c("datetime", "monitored", "nowcast")
example2_df
              datetime monitored nowcast
1  2015-08-24 12:00:00     461.7   403.1
2  2015-08-24 13:00:00     486.2   444.7
3  2015-08-24 14:00:00     510.4   477.6
4  2015-08-24 15:00:00     583.0   530.3
5  2015-08-24 16:00:00     645.7   588.0
6  2015-08-24 17:00:00     745.5   666.8
7  2015-08-24 18:00:00        NA   666.9
8  2015-08-24 19:00:00     711.0   696.4
9  2015-08-24 20:00:00     683.3   688.9
10 2015-08-24 21:00:00     589.8   636.1
11 2015-08-24 22:00:00     504.6   569.4
12 2015-08-24 23:00:00     478.5   543.8

Example 3: Long Missing Data Period

We now look at a longer period of missing data, from the day prior on 8/23/15.

Omak_2015_08_23 <- monitor_subset(Omak, tlim=c(2015082312, 2015082323))
(example3_df <- Omak_2015_08_23$data)
              datetime 530470013_01
1  2015-08-23 12:00:00        711.8
2  2015-08-23 13:00:00        734.0
3  2015-08-23 14:00:00        744.6
4  2015-08-23 15:00:00        763.8
5  2015-08-23 16:00:00           NA
6  2015-08-23 17:00:00           NA
7  2015-08-23 18:00:00           NA
8  2015-08-23 19:00:00           NA
9  2015-08-23 20:00:00           NA
10 2015-08-23 21:00:00        238.6
11 2015-08-23 22:00:00        149.9
12 2015-08-23 23:00:00        149.5

Here we see that the monitored data is missing for Hours 16-20. We again want to verify that these hours are properly excluded from the NowCast calculation for subsequent hours. This time we also want to ensure that NowCast returns invalid values for hours in which the minimum data availability requirements are not met (i.e. two of three most recent hours valid).

Formula Verification

Let's see if we can verify the accuracy of the NowCast value for Hour 23.

We again begin by pulling out our vector of values \(c_1\), \(c_2\), \(…\), \(c_N\)

(example3_values <- rev(example3_df$`530470013_01`))
 [1] 149.5 149.9 238.6    NA    NA    NA    NA    NA 763.8 744.6 734.0 711.8

and calculating \(w*\) and \(w\)

w_star <- min(example3_values, na.rm=TRUE)/max(example3_values, na.rm=TRUE)
(w <- max(1/2, w_star))
[1] 0.5

This time our numerator and denominator should both exclude the 4th-8th terms, since \(c_4\), \(c_5\), \(c_6\), \(c_7\) and \(c_8\) are invalid. So we have

validIndexes <- which(!is.na(example3_values))
numer <- sum(w^(validIndexes-1)*example3_values[validIndexes])
denom <- sum(w^(validIndexes-1))
numer/denom
[1] 164.7973

We truncate the value above to one decimal place for a final NowCast value of 164.7 for 8/23/15 Hour 23.

So how does this compare to our monitor_nowcast() output for the same hour?

monitor_subset(Omak_nowcast, tlim=rep(2015082323, 2))$data
             datetime 530470013_01
1 2015-08-23 23:00:00        164.7

Again, right on!

Missing Data Verification

Now we'll look at the monitored data alongside the NowCast data to see how the validity of the NowCast data was affected by the missing monitored hours.

example3_df$nowcast <- monitor_subset(Omak_nowcast, tlim=c(2015082312, 2015082323))$data$`530470013_01`
colnames(example3_df) <- c("datetime", "monitored", "nowcast")
example3_df
              datetime monitored nowcast
1  2015-08-23 12:00:00     711.8   667.8
2  2015-08-23 13:00:00     734.0   700.9
3  2015-08-23 14:00:00     744.6   722.8
4  2015-08-23 15:00:00     763.8   743.3
5  2015-08-23 16:00:00        NA   720.2
6  2015-08-23 17:00:00        NA      NA
7  2015-08-23 18:00:00        NA      NA
8  2015-08-23 19:00:00        NA      NA
9  2015-08-23 20:00:00        NA      NA
10 2015-08-23 21:00:00     238.6      NA
11 2015-08-23 22:00:00     149.9   185.1
12 2015-08-23 23:00:00     149.5   164.7

There's a lot going on here so let's walk through the data one step at a time.

Hours 12-15: NowCast data is valid because the monitored data is valid for all of the three most recent hours.
Status: GOOD

Hour 16: This is the first hour for which the monitored data is invalid. However, NowCast still returns a valid value this hour since the monitored data is still valid for two of the three most recent hours (Hours 14 and 15).
Status: GOOD

Hour 17: This is the first hour for which the NowCast data is invalid. This is because the monitored data is only valid for one of the three most recent hours (Hour 15).
Status: GOOD

Hours 18-20: NowCast is invalid since the monitored data is valid for none of the three most recent hours.
Status: GOOD

Hour 21: This is the first hour for which the monitored data is valid again. However, NowCast still returns an invalid value this hour since the monitored data is only valid for one of the three most recent hours (Hour 21).
Status: GOOD

Hour 22: This is the first hour for which the NowCast data is valid again. This is because the monitored data is again valid for two of the three most recent hours (Hours 21 and 22).
Status: GOOD

Hour 23: NowCast data is valid because the monitored data is valid for all of the three most recent hours. Status: GOOD

So, it appears the monitor_nowcast() returns data that has been correctly validated according to the NowCast algorithm and associated data availability requirements.

Does “most recent” include “current”?

A subtle point about the monitor_nowcast() function which falls out of the example above: the “current” hour is considered to be a part of the three “most recent clock hours”. This may seem strange at first, but to understand why we chose this approach, one must think about how the data is captured and how measurement timestamps correspond to the period they actually represent.

For particle pollution, measurements typically represent the mass of particles that accumulate on a filter during a set period of time, e.g. the past hour. Measurements come in at the end of the hour, but these measurements aren't necessarily representative of conditions at the exact times of the measurements. Instead, they are actually representative of concentrations during the previous clock hour. For example, if an hourly measurement comes in at 12:00, the measurement is actually representative of data during Hour 11, NOT Hour 12. So we call the 12:00 measurement the Hour 11 data point.

This is really just a labeling convention, and it is no different from how we treat other datasets. For example, suppose you wanted to take an average of the low temperatures for every day in July. You would have to wait until August 1st to do so, since the temperature might still be dropping at the end of the day on July 31st. But does this mean you would call this value the average low temperature for August, since it wasn't calculated until August? Of course not: the data belongs to July, even if it couldn't be calculated until August. It is no different with particle pollution: the Hour 11 data belongs to Hour 11, even if it wasn't calculated until 12:00. As a result of this convention, timestamps are usually an entire hour (or more) earlier than the time the measurements were actually taken (exact differences depend on several factors).

Another reason for including the “current” hour in the NowCast “three most recent hours” is for speed of updates. Suppose it is 12:04, and a measurement just came in at 12:00 (the Hour 11 measurement). It would be inappropriate to wait until 13:00 to calculate the updated NowCast value. For this reason, we calculate NowCast values using the monitored data for the “current” hour and the \(N-1\) prior hours.

Example 4: includeShortTerm argument

For our final NowCast example we will explore the includeShortTerm argument, including a demonstration of why it defaults to FALSE.

Suppose we wanted to know the NowCast values for Omak for the first half of 8/25/15, since concentrations were extremely high at the time. A normal course of action might be to create a ws_monitor object for Omak for 8/25/15:

tlim <- c(2015082500,2015082523)
Omak2 <- monitor_subset(Northwest_Megafires, tlim=tlim, monitorIDs = '530470013_01')
Omak2_nowcast <- monitor_nowcast(Omak2)
Omak2_nowcast$data
              datetime 530470013_01
1  2015-08-25 00:00:00           NA
2  2015-08-25 01:00:00           NA
3  2015-08-25 02:00:00           NA
4  2015-08-25 03:00:00           NA
5  2015-08-25 04:00:00           NA
6  2015-08-25 05:00:00           NA
7  2015-08-25 06:00:00           NA
8  2015-08-25 07:00:00           NA
9  2015-08-25 08:00:00           NA
10 2015-08-25 09:00:00           NA
11 2015-08-25 10:00:00           NA
12 2015-08-25 11:00:00        373.7
13 2015-08-25 12:00:00        370.0
14 2015-08-25 13:00:00        364.6
15 2015-08-25 14:00:00        365.4
16 2015-08-25 15:00:00           NA
17 2015-08-25 16:00:00           NA
18 2015-08-25 17:00:00           NA
19 2015-08-25 18:00:00           NA
20 2015-08-25 19:00:00           NA
21 2015-08-25 20:00:00           NA
22 2015-08-25 21:00:00           NA
23 2015-08-25 22:00:00           NA
24 2015-08-25 23:00:00        120.3

Unfortunately, the first 12 hours are invalid. But you read in the documentation that includeShortTerm=TRUE will return values for the second valid hour onwards. So you try again, this time setting includeShortTerm=TRUE. Let's check it out.

Omak2_nowcast <- monitor_nowcast(Omak2, includeShortTerm = TRUE)
Omak2_nowcast$data
              datetime 530470013_01
1  2015-08-25 00:00:00           NA
2  2015-08-25 01:00:00        456.3
3  2015-08-25 02:00:00        451.0
4  2015-08-25 03:00:00        420.7
5  2015-08-25 04:00:00        388.4
6  2015-08-25 05:00:00        389.9
7  2015-08-25 06:00:00        388.9
8  2015-08-25 07:00:00        382.7
9  2015-08-25 08:00:00        378.1
10 2015-08-25 09:00:00        375.9
11 2015-08-25 10:00:00        374.7
12 2015-08-25 11:00:00        373.7
13 2015-08-25 12:00:00        370.0
14 2015-08-25 13:00:00        364.6
15 2015-08-25 14:00:00        365.4
16 2015-08-25 15:00:00           NA
17 2015-08-25 16:00:00           NA
18 2015-08-25 17:00:00           NA
19 2015-08-25 18:00:00           NA
20 2015-08-25 19:00:00           NA
21 2015-08-25 20:00:00           NA
22 2015-08-25 21:00:00           NA
23 2015-08-25 22:00:00           NA
24 2015-08-25 23:00:00        120.3

Nice. We were able to get NowCast values for all but the first hour!

But there's a problem lurking. Setting includeShortTerm=TRUE caused the monitor_nowcast() function to treat hours prior to Hour 0 as invalid. It has no idea that valid data is available for this period.

As an experiment, let's see how the NowCast values would look if we calculated them from a larger dataset that includes the data prior to 8/25/15 Hour 0.

example4_df <- monitor_subset(Omak_nowcast, tlim=tlim)$data
example4_df$shortTerm_T <- Omak2_nowcast$data$`530470013_01`
colnames(example4_df) <- c("datetime", "fullDataset", "shortTerm")
example4_df
              datetime fullDataset shortTerm
1  2015-08-25 00:00:00       512.5        NA
2  2015-08-25 01:00:00       485.6     456.3
3  2015-08-25 02:00:00       466.1     451.0
4  2015-08-25 03:00:00       410.7     420.7
5  2015-08-25 04:00:00       372.3     388.4
6  2015-08-25 05:00:00       382.7     389.9
7  2015-08-25 06:00:00       384.7     388.9
8  2015-08-25 07:00:00       376.4     382.7
9  2015-08-25 08:00:00       373.5     378.1
10 2015-08-25 09:00:00       374.9     375.9
11 2015-08-25 10:00:00       374.6     374.7
12 2015-08-25 11:00:00       373.7     373.7
13 2015-08-25 12:00:00       370.0     370.0
14 2015-08-25 13:00:00       364.6     364.6
15 2015-08-25 14:00:00       365.4     365.4
16 2015-08-25 15:00:00          NA        NA
17 2015-08-25 16:00:00          NA        NA
18 2015-08-25 17:00:00          NA        NA
19 2015-08-25 18:00:00          NA        NA
20 2015-08-25 19:00:00          NA        NA
21 2015-08-25 20:00:00          NA        NA
22 2015-08-25 21:00:00          NA        NA
23 2015-08-25 22:00:00          NA        NA
24 2015-08-25 23:00:00       120.3     120.3

While not too extreme, we see differences in the NowCast values calculated by the different approaches, even as late as the 11th hour of the period. As expected, the values match from the 12th hour on.

The discrepancies displayed above are why, by default, includeShortTerm=FALSE. It should be used only when necessary, and with an understanding that the first \(N\) hours' values might not necessarily be true NowCast values.

If it exists, we recommend always grabbing an extra day of data at the beginning of the period if you think you might want to calculate NowCast values on a dataset.

Example 5: AQI

Finally, we'll perform a brief demonstration of the monitor_aqi() function using data from a prior example.

aqi <- monitor_aqi(Omak)
example5_df <- data.frame("datetime"=Omak$data$datetime,
                          "monitored"=Omak$data$`530470013_01`,
                          "aqi"=aqi$data$`530470013_01`)
example5_df <- example5_df[500:650,]
plot(example5_df$datetime, example5_df$monitored, xlab='Date', ylab='')
lines(example5_df$datetime, example5_df$aqi, col="blue")

plot of chunk unnamed-chunk-27